books

Anime North (#AN2017)

Showing off my manga haul for this year. I purchased the following:

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Also, here are some other irrelevant photos I took.

The FOLD Festival (#FOLD2017)

I attended the Festival of Literary Diversity (FOLD) recently in Brampton. The FOLD continues to provide diverse authors and audiences with a platform to connect and address the issues of diversity in the literary scene.

You can find some recorded panels on their Facebook page.

I took some photos at the festival and of the city:

Here’s my book haul:

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A few hashtags/points I’d like to point out to writers are the following:

For my fellow librarians/information professionals, we too can play a role in promoting and investing in diverse CanLit. It was mentioned at one panel that teachers and librarians are usually the first and best at generating buzz about books and purchasing them for their students/patrons. If we want to continue supporting diverse fiction, we can do so actively through our work.

OLA Super Conference 2017 (#OLASC)

The OLA Super Conference 2017 was held from Feb 1-4. It was a great experience and I gained a lot of practical knowledge.

The first session I attended was When Things Get Personal: Privacy vs Access in Online Community History, hosted by Irene Robillard, Cindy Preece, David Bott and Melissa Redden. They spoke about their digitization projects and the issue of balancing access to information while also enacting policies to protect the privacy of individuals appearing in their content.

Here are links to the collections/resources mentioned:

Next, I attended Are you User Experienced? A Beginner’s Guide to UX Testing, hosted by Micheal Laverty. Attendees were told about the process and strategies to design good UX in their physical library and on their sites.

Resources and terms to highlight are:

Lastly, I attended the The User Experience Design Sprint, hosted by Aurelia Engstrom and Graham Lavender. They spoke about the steps needed to run a successful UX project: setting a project plan, a discovery phase/competitive analysis, research, engaging users and stakeholder engagement.

Mentioned methods for UX testing involved:

Below are miscellaneous photos and my book haul.

Reblog: Protect Your Library the Medieval Way, With Horrifying Book Curses

How would you protect your precious books?

This article details how medieval scribes wrote curses on their books to deter people from stealing them. Some of the curses are colourful and I thought it would be fun to share them.

The article also mentions Marc Drogin’s Anathema!: Medieval Scribes and the History of Book Curses, which has compiled many book curses for our reading pleasure.

Reblog: North Korea’s Internet

I’m reblogging a pair of articles about North Korea’s internet:

It’s fascinating to glimpse what information is available and what isn’t for North Koreans. You can even visit North Korea’s intranet; it’s free to view for anyone with internet access.

Information, access and power are inherently tied to technology.

I have been reading a bit about the country and I highly recommend the following:

Short Story Publication

I’m happy to announce that my short story ‘Making the Myth’ has been published in Existere: A Journal of Arts & Literature (vol. 35, no. 2). You can obtain a copy of the issue by purchasing a subscription or visiting a bookstore that sells the journal.

Creative writing was and always will be my first passion. Seeing one’s work in a bookstore is surreal and a dream come true, to say the least. Below are photos of the issue.

The Manga Library at Anime North

While attending Anime North, I visited the Manga Library. The library had a wide selection, as seen in this list.

The Manga Library was run entirely by volunteers, set up for three days and open 24/7.

I personally checked out volume 7 of The Story of Saiunkoku.

I have various considerations to note about the existence of such a library. Libraries are made to serve their community. They also stay relevant by providing needed resources to their patrons. The Manga Library’s specialized collection makes accessible hundreds of titles that are out of print and unavailable at other libraries. This library provides a venue for patrons to read manga they otherwise would be unable to obtain. Volunteers can also recommend titles to patrons, which is an aspect of readers’ advisory; such conversations connect readers to potentially new materials.

See below for pictures of the Manga Library, including a few acrobats.