Canada

The Self-publishing Journey (Part 1)

This year, I intend to self-publish a novella.

The tentative title is ‘Incompatible.’ It’s a historical romance.

I’ll be documenting my journey, while also providing tips on self-publishing.

Note: The information provided is applicable to Canadian authors.

Step 1: The First Edit

I printed out my draft and started editing.

Scheduling when I was supposed to finish each chapter was immensely helpful with staying on track. Refer to 2015 Guide to Self-Publishing, Revised Edition: The Most Comprehensive Guide to Self-Publishing‘s checklist (pg. 31) to help you plan the entire self-publishing process.

I also regularly attended writing groups to ensure that I worked frequently.

Step 2: Hire an Editor

You can find someone via Fiverr, UpWork, Editors Canada, personal connections, etc.

For tax/legal purposes, I used the contract template available at Editors Canada to formalize the terms with my editor.

Step 3: Get the ISBN

In Canada, the ISBN can be obtained for free via Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

You must create an ISBN Canada account. The publisher name, address, email and phone number you provide will become publicly available online. For privacy/business purposes, consider registering with a business name and/or getting a postal box. You can rent a postal box at Canada Post, UPS, or elsewhere.

Try and register with LAC as early as you can, because processing your account will take 1-2 weeks. You don’t need to have an officially registered business name to use it as your publisher’s name.

Once you get your login information, you can sign in and obtain an ISBN for your work. Note that the hardcopy and ebook version of your book will need their own ISBNs for keeping track of sales.

An ISBN can also be obtained via Amazon, if you publish with them, but I decided on registering my work through LAC.

You can also view my tutorial on how to sign up as a publisher:

The FOLD Festival (#FOLD2017)

I attended the Festival of Literary Diversity (FOLD) recently in Brampton. The FOLD continues to provide diverse authors and audiences with a platform to connect and address the issues of diversity in the literary scene.

You can find some recorded panels on their Facebook page.

I took some photos at the festival and of the city:

Here’s my book haul:

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A few hashtags/points I’d like to point out to writers are the following:

For my fellow librarians/information professionals, we too can play a role in promoting and investing in diverse CanLit. It was mentioned at one panel that teachers and librarians are usually the first and best at generating buzz about books and purchasing them for their students/patrons. If we want to continue supporting diverse fiction, we can do so actively through our work.

The Festival of Literary Diversity (#FOLD2016)

I had the pleasure of attending the inaugural Festival of Literary Diversity (FOLD) in downtown Brampton. This festival provided an outlet for readers, authors and publishers to connect with one another and promote diverse Canadian literature.

Some panels focused on the writing and publishing process. Other panels discussed the current state of the publishing industry and the issues surrounding it. It was an engaging and enlightening experience. It has inspired me to seek out and support diverse Canadian authors.

A huge congratulations to Jael Richardson, the other organizers and volunteers who made the FOLD possible. The festival has come at a time when diversity has come to the forefront of issues in literature. Providing a Canadian outlet has contributed to addressing the issue of diversity in fiction.

I look forward to attending the next FOLD.

See above for the photos I took at the FOLD. I also took photos of Brampton and art housed in the Peel Art Gallery Museum.

My book haul included the following:

  • The Illegal by Lawrence Hill
  • The Girl who was Saturday Night by Heather O’Neill
  • even this page is white by Vivek Shraya
  • The Room, issue 39.1 (featuring only women of colour)

OLA Super Conference 2016 (#olasc16)

In January, I attended the OLA Super Conference 2016. I learned a lot and met old and new friends.

Thursday

The first session I attended was Tracy Church’s Introduction to Prospect Research. This was a great, condensed introduction to prospect research.

Her presentation is available here.

The second session I attended was I Found my Dream Job, But It’s not in a Library, hosted by June Avila, Hannah Loshak and Emily Porta. They spoke about their non-librarian paths in the information field and told us about the alternative and niche careers available to information professionals.

Their slides contain various examples of non-traditional jobs and the options out there.

Friday

The first session I attended was Dayna DeBenedet’s When the Job Search Ends: Management Tips. She provided excellent information and personal advice on how to be a manager and lead one’s staff.

Her slides have further details on the steps and things to consider when you’re a head librarian.

The last session I attended was Launching the FOLD (Festival of Literary Diversity) in Brampton, hosted by June Dickenson, Catherine Carreiro and Jael Richardson. They spoke about the goals, events and progress of planning this upcoming festival. It will promote diverse Canadian literature and authors on a level that has never been done before in this country.

The slides can be viewed here.

You can track the developments of the FOLD, learn how to get involved and find out how to register here.

In between sessions, I attended the Expo and obtained many free goodies (see below).

The conference was wrapped up by Wab Kinew, who was a keynote speaker. Unfortunately, I haven’t found a recording online. Regardless, his speech was amazing and I highly recommend checking out his works.