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The Canadian Museum for Human Rights

I visited the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg. I highly recommend it for anyone who has the opportunity to visit this museum.

Below is a selection of photos I took.

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Anime North (#AN2017)

Showing off my manga haul for this year. I purchased the following:

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Also, here are some other irrelevant photos I took.

The FOLD Festival (#FOLD2017)

I attended the Festival of Literary Diversity (FOLD) recently in Brampton. The FOLD continues to provide diverse authors and audiences with a platform to connect and address the issues of diversity in the literary scene.

You can find some recorded panels on their Facebook page.

I took some photos at the festival and of the city:

Here’s my book haul:

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A few hashtags/points I’d like to point out to writers are the following:

For my fellow librarians/information professionals, we too can play a role in promoting and investing in diverse CanLit. It was mentioned at one panel that teachers and librarians are usually the first and best at generating buzz about books and purchasing them for their students/patrons. If we want to continue supporting diverse fiction, we can do so actively through our work.

The Art of Cartography

I went to the Art of Cartography exhibit hosted at the Toronto Reference Library. It was fascinating to see how cartography and its practices have changed throughout the ages.

Highlights included:

Frislanda, a fictional island that had been included in maps for over a century
-The politically charged ‘beaver maps’

Below are the images I took.

Short Story Publication

I’m happy to announce that my short story ‘Making the Myth’ has been published in Existere: A Journal of Arts & Literature (vol. 35, no. 2). You can obtain a copy of the issue by purchasing a subscription or visiting a bookstore that sells the journal.

Creative writing was and always will be my first passion. Seeing one’s work in a bookstore is surreal and a dream come true, to say the least. Below are photos of the issue.

The Manga Library at Anime North

While attending Anime North, I visited the Manga Library. The library had a wide selection, as seen in this list.

The Manga Library was run entirely by volunteers, set up for three days and open 24/7.

I personally checked out volume 7 of The Story of Saiunkoku.

I have various considerations to note about the existence of such a library. Libraries are made to serve their community. They also stay relevant by providing needed resources to their patrons. The Manga Library’s specialized collection makes accessible hundreds of titles that are out of print and unavailable at other libraries. This library provides a venue for patrons to read manga they otherwise would be unable to obtain. Volunteers can also recommend titles to patrons, which is an aspect of readers’ advisory; such conversations connect readers to potentially new materials.

See below for pictures of the Manga Library, including a few acrobats.