public library

Seattle – Central Library

On a smoky day in Seattle, I visited the Central Library. It’s the largest one in their public library system and famous for its design. See below for the pictures I took.

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Reblog: How to Spot Fake News

I’m reblogging this post by the Toronto Public Library about identifying fake news.

It’s important that we remain critical about content online. Information professionals should especially scrutinize online resources.

My NaNoWriMo Adventure (#NaNo2016)

Last month, I participated in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). The objective was to write at least 50,000 words within a month. Although I didn’t win, I was still able to get a lot of writing done. It was also a great time to socialize with fellow local writers.

The Toronto Public Library has been involved by hosting write-ins and author spotlight events. You can learn more about NaNoWriMo and how the TPL is involved by reading this blog post.

NaNoWriMo is an incredibly productive, chaotic and fun experience; I encourage all writerly types to try it. One should also consider participating in Camp NaNo in April and July, where you set your own word count goal.

The Art of Cartography

I went to the Art of Cartography exhibit hosted at the Toronto Reference Library. It was fascinating to see how cartography and its practices have changed throughout the ages.

Highlights included:

Frislanda, a fictional island that had been included in maps for over a century
-The politically charged ‘beaver maps’

Below are the images I took.

Reblog: Pokémon GO: What Do Librarians Need To Know?

I’m sharing a great article about Pokemon GO and libraries. It covers topics on how the game can be used by the library and its issues.

It’s exciting to see the societal impact of a single game.

Where’s Pikachu? How libraries are connecting with patrons over this wildly popular new virtual treasure hunt that uses geolocation—and why the game raises privacy concerns.

Source: Pokémon GO: What Do Librarians Need To Know?

OLA Super Conference 2016 (#olasc16)

In January, I attended the OLA Super Conference 2016. I learned a lot and met old and new friends.

Thursday

The first session I attended was Tracy Church’s Introduction to Prospect Research. This was a great, condensed introduction to prospect research.

Her presentation is available here.

The second session I attended was I Found my Dream Job, But It’s not in a Library, hosted by June Avila, Hannah Loshak and Emily Porta. They spoke about their non-librarian paths in the information field and told us about the alternative and niche careers available to information professionals.

Their slides contain various examples of non-traditional jobs and the options out there.

Friday

The first session I attended was Dayna DeBenedet’s When the Job Search Ends: Management Tips. She provided excellent information and personal advice on how to be a manager and lead one’s staff.

Her slides have further details on the steps and things to consider when you’re a head librarian.

The last session I attended was Launching the FOLD (Festival of Literary Diversity) in Brampton, hosted by June Dickenson, Catherine Carreiro and Jael Richardson. They spoke about the goals, events and progress of planning this upcoming festival. It will promote diverse Canadian literature and authors on a level that has never been done before in this country.

The slides can be viewed here.

You can track the developments of the FOLD, learn how to get involved and find out how to register here.

In between sessions, I attended the Expo and obtained many free goodies (see below).

The conference was wrapped up by Wab Kinew, who was a keynote speaker. Unfortunately, I haven’t found a recording online. Regardless, his speech was amazing and I highly recommend checking out his works.