self-publishing

The Self-publishing Journey (Part 1)

This year, I intend to self-publish a novella.

The tentative title is ‘Incompatible.’ It’s a historical romance.

I’ll be documenting my journey, while also providing tips on self-publishing.

Note: The information provided is applicable to Canadian authors.

Step 1: The First Edit

I printed out my draft and started editing.

Scheduling when I was supposed to finish each chapter was immensely helpful with staying on track. Refer to 2015 Guide to Self-Publishing, Revised Edition: The Most Comprehensive Guide to Self-Publishing‘s checklist (pg. 31) to help you plan the entire self-publishing process.

I also regularly attended writing groups to ensure that I worked frequently.

Step 2: Hire an Editor

You can find someone via Fiverr, UpWork, Editors Canada, personal connections, etc.

For tax/legal purposes, I used the contract template available at Editors Canada to formalize the terms with my editor.

Step 3: Get the ISBN

In Canada, the ISBN can be obtained for free via Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

You must create an ISBN Canada account. The publisher name, address, email and phone number you provide will become publicly available online. For privacy/business purposes, consider registering with a business name and/or getting a postal box. You can rent a postal box at Canada Post, UPS, or elsewhere.

Try and register with LAC as early as you can, because processing your account will take 1-2 weeks. You don’t need to have an officially registered business name to use it as your publisher’s name.

Once you get your login information, you can sign in and obtain an ISBN for your work. Note that the hardcopy and ebook version of your book will need their own ISBNs for keeping track of sales.

An ISBN can also be obtained via Amazon, if you publish with them, but I decided on registering my work through LAC.

You can also view my tutorial on how to sign up as a publisher:

Book Printing at the TPL

The Toronto Public Library is offering a new book printing service!

 Heavy_breathing_cat

I will always be a writer first and an information professional second, so it’s exciting to know that as a Torontonian, if I decide to self-publish, I can print it at the library.

This is a great opportunity to have a book printed at a reasonable cost. Books can be between 40-800 pages and it can be anything from a cookbook to a dissertation.

I can see the makerspace/DIY trend going strong in the TPL, as they continue to offer other opportunities such as training you to use a 3-D printer among other things. Though I will not be entering public librarianship, I admire the initiatives by its staff and will definitely take advantage of what they offer.